Home » Cats » New (Kind of) Additions to our Household Zoo – Pt. Deux

New (Kind of) Additions to our Household Zoo – Pt. Deux

After we got home in record time (spent 1 short night in some remote “town” in Indiana – I won’t go into the motel accommodations – HA!) I got to work getting Leslie’s new home set up.  We had used a 10 gallon tank I’d bought years ago for many things – fish, a toad, tadpoles, crawdads, more fish…Anyway, after researching what we needed to prepare, we got Leslie’s home ready.  It was pretty cool actually.  I went to the pet store the next day for pinhead crickets & other supplies.  He seemed content – although not a pet you should handle, according to what we read.  But fun to look at and watch for my son.

One morning, about 4 months later, my son found Leslie dead in his very shallow water bowl.  He was very upset.  We had no idea how or why Leslie had died and had an even harder time trying to explain to my son (who has ADHD & we recently found out possibly Asperger syndrome) that sometimes nature takes it’s course.  We held a funereal for Leslie and he/she is buried alongside my (our) 2 cats that had crossed the Rainbow Bridge years before.  It’s a beautiful spot – under giant pine trees and across from our increasingly abundant berry bushes in the very back portion of our yard (we live in the burbs, but have over an acre of wooded land).

A few weeks later, my mother in law came over, as usual, to work with my son on his homework and had a surprise…She had bought him an albino leopard gecko!  And so, our journey into the lizard world continued…The gecko was named Leslie II – because, as is the case with most reptiles, the sex is hard to tell until they are completely mature (she was still a juvenile) and because my son wanted to commemorate his first Leslie – the 5-lined skink.  My son was overjoyed!  I was thinking, oh boy – more keeping crickets & trips to the pet store once or twice a week…We already have a cat (my baby barn kitty I got 3 yrs. ago rescued from living a very short life outdoors in a barn & part feral – well, she used to be…), a chocolate lab, 2 bettas & a tank of fish.

As turns out, she is very docile and extremely cute – for a lizard.  I began to realize that I was becoming just as fascinated with her as my son – if not more so!  We bought a new 20 gallon tank with all the necessary equipment and I have probably gone overboard filling it with decorations and researching what geckos like or need in their living space.  My son can hold and handle her without any concerns that she will scramble off or bite him.  (The pic below is not the real Leslie II – again, Google stock photo…)

Before we knew whether she was a “she”, I was already certain of her gender.  She loves pink fleece and will perch happily on my shoulder – sometimes a little too close – climbing into my hair and getting somewhat tangled, but it’s all good.  We took her to the pet store a month or so ago for them to “sex” her & yes, she is definitely a female.  The lady who helped us was very impressed with her since she didn’t squirm or bite when she held her to look at her belly.  Another concern with geckos is “dropping their tails” when they feel threatened.  Leslie is very laid back…My kind of lizard~!

As Christmas approached, my son wanted a friend for Leslie.  Again, more research – it’s OK to have 2 females but not a great idea to add a male with only 1 female.  I won’t go into specifics, but let’s just say males prefer a harem & most certainly do not want to be around other males.  They also need to be about the same size to prevent one trying to be the dominate gecko & causing stress, which can kill them.  I began my quest for finding Leslie’s new roommate.

About 3 weeks before Christmas, I found another leopard gecko that seemed to be about the same size and was NOT an albino (my son was quite specific) – although they couldn’t tell me whether it was male or female.  I decided to risk it anyway since my mother in law & I were not having much luck up to that point.  The pet store let me pay for it & keep it at the store for a couple of weeks.

A week before Christmas the pet store called to say I needed to collect my gecko.  My son got an early gift (he tends to get them anyway) and was very excited.  Only problem was this one is not so docile & very skiddish.  I’m sure it was raised in the pet store (not the one I typically go to which is locally owned, not a chain) and never handled or socialized.  My son named him/her “Sam” – again, a name that could go either way since we didn’t know the gender.  My son put him in the tank with Leslie and from that point on they would curl up together in the “rock” hide.  A good sign I thought – at least they seem to get along.

Yep, they get long alright – only too well.  About a week ago, I found 2 eggs buried in the moss in the “moist” hide .  One mystery solved – Sam is definitely a male.  My son was so excited!  We’re going to have baby geckos!!  Yea~!  More research on how to incubate the eggs, how many will she lay, etc.

Day before yesterday, my son insisted that the hide needed to be misted – I hadn’t found the right container or substrate yet to transfer the eggs.  Up until that time I had not touched the eggs.  When I did touch the one on top, it was very soft & come to find out, stuck to the egg underneath.  Not good.  So, I removed the hide and disposed of the contents rather reluctantly – my son was not convinced that they may not hatch.  He commented “don’t be surprised if some baby geckos appear in our trashcan”.  Ummmm…no.  But I can’t blame him for being optimistic!

Here’s some more pics of Sam & Leslie & their home and with that – this post finally comes to an end…(OK, I give up trying to figure out how to keep previous pics from showing up below…arrrggg…so actually it’s pics of the entire pet menagerie)

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3 thoughts on “New (Kind of) Additions to our Household Zoo – Pt. Deux

  1. In order to incubate eggs, you’ll want to put vermiculite in the laying chamber and keep it moist (water shouldn’t come out with you squeeze it). You’ll also need to remove the eggs (in vermiculite) to an incubator because fluctuations of temperature are bad. If you try to incubate, pick the eggs up and lay them exactly as you found them. Turning can detach the embryo.

    Make sure you offer your lizards calcium. Laying eggs depletes their resources.

    Any questions? Feel free to ask. Leopard geckos are fabulous, and we’ve hatched dozens.

  2. Thank you so much for your post! I had read that in my research but unfortunately wasn’t prepared & didn’t remove them immediately. Leslie licked calcium powder off my finger this morning – I had put some out in the food dish & also dusted the last batch of crickets. Sam discovered the powder in the dish & he licked some up as well!

    I do have a question for you, if you don’t mind – Is it bad for Leslie to be the only female in the tank with Sam? If so, what would you recommend that we do (other than adding another female…)

  3. Pingback: Exotic Pet Care – Lizards for Beginners by Pet Care 360

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